Autism Awareness

A week ago the Centers for Disease Control reported that the autism rate is now 1 in 88 children, a significant increase since 2000 when the rate was 1 in 150 children. In the weeks to come much will be written about why the increase, and what is being done to deal with this epidemic.

Because I work with children on the spectrum, I will be asked my opinion about why the rise in autism and my answer today is the same as it was last year and the year before that. I, like many in the field, believe environmental toxins coupled with genetic factors are most likely the leading causes to autism. I also believe that children with autism can get well, recover and even lose their diagnosis. I have been fortunate to see recovery happen, and it does so but not without a great deal of commitment and dedication by the family and many treatment providers.

How does recovery happen? There is no magic bullet that is for sure. Research suggests that early intervention is critical in treating children with autism. It has been my experience that therapies alone are not enough. Why, because many children with autism have difficulty detoxifying toxins which result in compromised immune systems that ultimately lead to a myriad of health problems. To me it’s simple, children who are not well, cannot learn. In my practice I have seen children who utilize a more holistic approach, including alternative therapies such as special diets, and homotoxicology, in combination with traditional therapies report significant improvements in their overall health. In many cases, health related symptoms resolve within the first few months and rapid progress is noted.

If you are looking for additional information on homotoxicology or a holistic approach to treating autism, please go to my website www.essentialhealingsolutions.net .

References:
CDC. Prevalence of autism spectrum disorders—Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring Network, fourteen sites, United States, 2008. MMWR March 30, 2012 / 61(SS03); 1-19
http://articles.cnn.com/2009-11-30/health/autism.study_1_autism-applied-behavioral-analysis-geraldine-dawson/2?_s=PM:HEALTH

*